Working Session proposal: Watching and Talk Pages in Drupal 7

Many wikis, including Wikipedia, encourage user-centered curation through a combination of discussion and notification: Talk pages and Watching. Talk pages are forums affiliated with each content page, where users can defend or question posted information, providing both a history of how the wiki page arrived at its present form and a rationale for why it should or shouldn’t change in the future. When Watching is enabled, users can opt to receive email or RSS notifications whenever specified pages are modified; in this way users can help to maintain the quality of content for which they have the greatest expertise.

In this session, I’d like to work on implementing these features within a Drupal 7 site, using modules such as Rules and QuickTabs, to enable watching and tab-separated comments at the level of individual nodes.

I haven’t done this before, so any expert help is welcome, but so are any other intermediate (or even beginner) Drupal users who are interested in figuring it out alongside me.

I’ll be working with a development version of writingstudiestree.org, a D7-based crowdsourced academic genealogy of writing studies, composition and rhetoric.

Categories: Administrative, Collaboration, Crowdsourcing, Session Proposals | Tags: , , , |
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About benmiller314

I'm ABD towards a PhD in English at the CUNY Grad Center, where my dissertation research involves visualizing metadata from 3,000+ recent PhD theses in Composition/Rhetoric/Writing Studies, with the goal of discovering the extent to which the discipline coheres around shared methodology, terminology, or objects of study. I've worked with faculty in biology and theatre as a consultant in Writing Across the Curriculum, and taught writing at Hunter College and Columbia University. In addition to the dissertation, I'm currently developing the Writing Studies Tree (writingstudiestree.org), a Drupal-7-based crowdsourced database for recording and visualizing mentorship relationships (academic genealogy) in Writing Studies, and I'm one of two lead editors on the upcoming issue of The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy (jitpedagogy.org). At THATcamp, I'm especially interested in learning from you all about data visualization, data sharing via APIs, and shared editorial workflow management. I'm happy to help you with Wikidot, Zotero, and all manner of writing pedagogy (since writing, too, is a technology...).